You are currently viewing Easy Fermented Garlic Honey Recipe + Benefits and Uses ~ Homestead and Chill

Easy Fermented Garlic Honey Recipe + Benefits and Uses ~ Homestead and Chill

Fermented garlic honey is a fantastic herbal remedy to have on hand, especially during the cold and flu season! Come learn how to make delicious fermented garlic honey in this simple step-by-step guide. It’s a great way to preserve garlic and incredibly easy to make – the perfect project for beginners or experienced fermenters alike. This article will also explore the stellar health benefits of honey fermented garlic, highlight many different ways to use it, and address concerns about botulism.

What is fermented garlic honey? 

Fermented garlic honey is a simple natural health remedy commonly used to support the immune system, cardiovascular system, and digestive health as well as alleviate cold and flu symptoms such as coughs or sore throats. It is made by infusing cloves of raw garlic in honey, allowing them to ferment together over time. 

Unlike many other fermented concoctions, this honey fermented garlic recipe doesn’t require a starter culture or brine. The honey itself has acidic antimicrobial and prebiotic properties that safely ferment the garlic, limiting the growth of harmful pathogens while encouraging gut-healthy probiotics to form. 

A jar of honey is being poured into a pint jar that contains cloves of peeled garlic. The honey is almost to the brim of the pint jar, bulbs and cloves of garlic decorate the area surrounding the jar. A jar of honey is being poured into a pint jar that contains cloves of peeled garlic. The honey is almost to the brim of the pint jar, bulbs and cloves of garlic decorate the area surrounding the jar.

Disclosure: Homestead and Chill is reader-supported. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. 

What are the benefits of fermented garlic in honey?

On their own, honey and garlic each offer incredible health and nutritional benefits. Combined, fermented honey garlic is a true medicinal powerhouse – much like homemade fire cider! Not to mention the added benefits of fermentation. Hellooo probiotics.

The health benefits of honey fermented garlic include:

  • Garlic contains allicin, a potent immune-stimulating sulfur compound that’s activated when garlic is crushed or fermented. Studies show that allicin helps to increase circulation and white blood cell counts, and boasts anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-protozoal AND anti-viral properties! Meaning, fermented garlic honey can help your body better prevent or fight off a wide variety of infections, colds, and flu bugs.
  • Garlic and honey both contain impressive levels of antioxidants that help reduce inflammation, oxidative stress, cancer, and other chronic health conditions. Garlic can also improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels, simultaneously reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and events.
  • Thick and sweet, honey is excellent at soothing sore throats and naturally suppressing coughs. Like garlic, honey is also highly antimicrobial. Honey can help ward off internal pathogens when ingested, and can even be used topically to heal wounds too!
  • Rich in both prebiotics and probiotics, fermented honey garlic can help soothe an upset stomach, improve digestion and overall gastrointestinal health. Both garlic and honey contain natural prebiotics that work to balance your gut’s microbiome. Fermented together, those prebiotics also interact with the wild yeasts and beneficial bacteria found on garlic to form gut-friendly probiotics too. 
An above image of a small spoon resting inside a jar of fermented garlic honey, there are many bubbles on the surface of the honey.An above image of a small spoon resting inside a jar of fermented garlic honey, there are many bubbles on the surface of the honey.

Supplies Needed

  • A mason jar or other container with a lid
  • Fresh raw garlic cloves or green garlic (enough to fill your container at least halfway)
  • Raw honey (enough to fill your container). We love to use raw local honey when possible!
  • Optional: To give your fermented honey an extra special kick, feel free to add a small handful of fresh thyme, sage leaves, and/or slices of fresh ginger or jalapenos to the jar as well!

To make a pint-size batch of fermented garlic honey, you’ll need approximately 4 large bulbs (heads) of garlic and about 1.25 to 1.5 cups (300 – 350 mLs) of honey.

An above image of a jar of honey laying on a wooden cutting board. There is a white ceramic bowl full of bulbs of garlic and a few cloves and bulbs are also scattered around the surrounding area as well. An above image of a jar of honey laying on a wooden cutting board. There is a white ceramic bowl full of bulbs of garlic and a few cloves and bulbs are also scattered around the surrounding area as well.

How to Make Fermented Garlic Honey

  1. Begin by peeling the cloves of raw garlic.
  2. Next, add the peeled cloves of garlic to a clean jar or other glass container with a lid. Add enough garlic to fill the jar at least one-half to two-thirds full.
  3. Pour the honey over the garlic until it’s completely full.* It usually takes a few minutes for the honey to seep and settle between all the cloves of garlic, which will then start to float. Top off the jar with more honey as needed after settling. 

*Tip: If your honey is cold and difficult to pour, warm it up first by placing the jar of honey in a bowl of hot water. Avoid heating the honey directly however, as that can destroy some of the medicinal compounds and health benefits of the honey. 

A jar of honey is being poured into a separate pint jar that is over halfway filled with peeled garlic cloves. There are bulbs and cloves of garlic with their peel still on surrounding the area around the jar. A jar of honey is being poured into a separate pint jar that is over halfway filled with peeled garlic cloves. There are bulbs and cloves of garlic with their peel still on surrounding the area around the jar.
An above image of a jar of honey and garlic, some of the cloves are floating on the surface of the honey. Scattered around the area are bulbs and cloves of garlic. An above image of a jar of honey and garlic, some of the cloves are floating on the surface of the honey. Scattered around the area are bulbs and cloves of garlic.

Instructions continued 

  1. Loosely add a lid, but don’t tighten it completely. It’s important that fermentation gasses can escape from the jar.
  2. Set the jar of garlic honey in a cool dark location to ferment, such as a cupboard or pantry. I recommend setting the jar on a plate since it’s possible it may overflow and can be very sticky.
  3. During the first week of fermentation, either stir or gently turn/shake the jar every day (but be sure to tighten the lid first, and then re-loosen it after!) I usually tighten the lid, flip the jar upside down for a few minutes, turn it back right-side up, and then loosen the lid again. This helps to prevent mold by rotating and coating the garlic cloves that are floating on top.
  4. Within a few days, you’ll likely see bubbles forming within the jar, though it’s okay if you don’t. The honey will also start to become increasingly runny over time – that’s normal! As the honey draws moisture out of the garlic, the cloves get smaller and slightly crispy over time too.
  5. It takes about a month for the garlic honey to fully ferment, though you can get into the jar to enjoy it sooner too. 
A pint mason jar full of honey and garlic is sitting on a white ceramic plat on top of a small wooden cutting board. A pint mason jar full of honey and garlic is sitting on a white ceramic plat on top of a small wooden cutting board.
A full pint mason jar is sitting upside down on a small plate to fully coat the contents inside. A full pint mason jar is sitting upside down on a small plate to fully coat the contents inside.

How to take or use fermented garlic honey

Take 1 tablespoon (15 mL) of fermented honey or eat 1 full clove of garlic when you feel a sickness coming on, up to 3 times daily. It can also be consumed daily for general health and prevention, even when you’re feeling fine!   

Fermented garlic honey is considered safe for children ages 2 years and older. 

A small spoon is full of fermented garlic honey with a clove sitting in the middle of the spoon as well. Below is the jar of garlic honey, the cloves of garlic are exposed to the air as they float above the honey. A small spoon is full of fermented garlic honey with a clove sitting in the middle of the spoon as well. Below is the jar of garlic honey, the cloves of garlic are exposed to the air as they float above the honey.

Ways to use fermented garlic honey

  1. Take a spoonful straight from the jar to support your immune system, digestion, or general health (as described above)
  2. Use it in homemade salad dressings or marinades.
  3. Drizzle it over savory snacks like crackers and cheese, goat cheese stuffed dates, herb and cheese puffed pastries, or even over pizza! 
  4. Spread it over toast, sourdough focaccia, English muffins, sourdough cornbread or other bread.
  5. Add a drizzle of honey or garlic clove to soup, pasta, rice, potato salad, or egg dishes.
  6. Use it in garlicky dips like hummus, tzatziki, homemade veggie dip or ranch dressing, or this dill lemon yogurt sauce.
  7. Drizzle it over roasted or sauteed vegetables. 

No matter what you do, it’s best to use fermented garlic honey raw as a finishing touch or topping when possible. Avoid heating it in order to preserve the maximum healing potential. 

How long does fermented garlic honey last or stay good for?

Honey fermented garlic is shelf-stable and lasts for many, many years. Stored in a cool dark location (like a pantry or cupboard), it lasts almost indefinitely… until you use it all up! As long as no mold occurs, it’s likely still good. 

Note that it’s normal for the honey and garlic to darken over time. The garlic cloves may turn slightly green or blue, or even almost black after a few years. 

A close up image of a pint jar full of fermented garlic honey, the cloves are floating in the honey, taking up about half the pint jar while a few garlic cloves are poking out of the top, above the honey. A close up image of a pint jar full of fermented garlic honey, the cloves are floating in the honey, taking up about half the pint jar while a few garlic cloves are poking out of the top, above the honey.

Should I worry about botulism in honey fermented garlic?

No, I wouldn’t – and I’m a retired health inspector! Botulism is a common concern when it comes to preserving garlic (such as garlic in oil) but not so much with fermented honey garlic. 

First of all, honey is naturally acidic. With an average pH of 3.2 to 4.5, the acidic nature of honey will prevent the growth of bacteria, mold, or other harmful pathogens – including botulism. Botulism cannot grow below a pH of 4.6.

Second, though it’s often fretted over, botulism is pretty darn rare! In fact, the CDC reports that from 1996 to 2004, there were only 145 cases of botulism in the United States from home-prepared foods. 43 of those cases were linked to preserved vegetables – mostly involved with improper canning of high pH foods (not what we are doing here).

An image of a piece of honeycomb sitting on top of a wood cutting board. A wooden honey dowel is resting on the honeycomb and there are chamomile flowers on top of and around the honeycomb. An image of a piece of honeycomb sitting on top of a wood cutting board. A wooden honey dowel is resting on the honeycomb and there are chamomile flowers on top of and around the honeycomb.

Honey pH variations and botulism

The pH of honey can vary slightly depending on the source of pollen. For instance, orange blossom, rosemary, lavender, acacia, rhododendron, thyme and sunflower honey consistently have an average pH of 3.5 to 3.9, while eucalyptus, dandelion, heather, honeydew, chestnut and manuka honey can range up to 4.5 in some cases. Therefore if you’re concerned about botulism, you could choose a lower pH honey in this fermented garlic honey recipe. 

It’s also easy (and inexpensive) to test the pH of your finished fermented honey at home using a basic litmus paper test strip. If the pH is bordering close to 4.6 (or you just want to play it safe) simply add a little splash of raw apple cider vinegar to the honey mixture to lower the pH a tad. 

Again, I wouldn’t worry too much about it! I just wanted to address this common question.

And that’s how it’s done.

I hope you enjoyed this lesson, and are excited to make some garlic honey of your own! Please let us know if you have any questions in the comments below, and leave a review or share this post if you found it useful. Cheers to strong a immune system and good health!

You may also like:

Easy Fermented Honey Garlic

Learn how to make fermented honey garlic with our easy recipe, including the health benefits and many ways to use it. This delicious natural health remedy supports the immune system, gut health, soothes sore throats, and more!

Prep Time15 minutes

Ferment Time30 days

Course: Condiment, Fermented Foods, Sauce

Keyword: fermented garlic honey, honey fermented garlic

  • 1.5 cups raw honey
  • 3-4 large bulbs (heads) of raw garlic, separated into cloves and peeled
  • Begin by peeling the cloves of raw garlic.

  • Add the peeled cloves of garlic to a clean jar or other glass container with a lid. Add enough garlic to fill the jar at least one-half to two-thirds full.

  • Pour the honey over the garlic until it’s completely full.* It usually takes a few minutes for the honey to seep and settle between all the cloves of garlic, which will then start to float. Top off the jar with more honey as needed after settling. 

  • Loosely add a lid on top, but don’t tighten it completely. It’s important that fermentation gasses can escape from the jar.

  • Set the jar of garlic honey in a cool dark location to ferment, such as a cupboard or pantry. I recommend setting the jar on a plate since it’s possible it may overflow and can be very sticky.

  • During the first week of fermentation, either stir or gently turn/shake the jar every day (but be sure to tighten the lid first, and then re-loosen it after!) This helps to prevent mold by rotating and coating the garlic cloves that are floating on top.

  • Within a few days, you’ll likely see bubbles forming within the jar, though it’s okay if you don’t. The honey will also start to become increasingly runny over time – that’s normal!

  • It takes about a month for the garlic honey to fully ferment, though you can get into the jar to enjoy it sooner too. 

  • To use: take 1 tablespoon (15 mL) of fermented honey or eat 1 full clove of garlic when you feel a sickness coming on, up to 3 times daily. It can also be consumed daily for general health and prevention, even when you’re feeling fine! You can also drizzle it over breads, salads, cheesy and savory snacks, and more.

  • Store in a cool dark location. Fermented honey garlic will stay good for many, many years. It is normal for it to darken in color over time. The cloves of garlic may also turn slightly blue to green.

*Tip: If your honey is cold and difficult to pour, warm it up first by placing the jar of honey in a bowl of hot water. Avoid heating the honey directly however, as that can destroy some of the medicinal compounds and health benefits of the honey. 

DeannaCat signature, keep on growingDeannaCat signature, keep on growing

Source link

Leave a Reply